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Friday, July 25, 2014

Deadly Ebola Virus Is Now In Nigeria: How To Prevent It

The fast killer, Ebola virus, has been confirmed in a hospital near Obalende in Lagos on a 40years old Liberian. There is panic in the air but you can stay free from the deadly virus. Check out the details below...

WHAT IS EBOLA VIRUS DISEASE?
Ebola virus disease (EVD) or Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) is the human disease caused by ebola viruses. Symptoms start two days to three weeks after contracting the virus with a fever, throat and muscle pains, and headaches. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the disease has a 
case fatality rate of up to 90 per cent, this means about 90 per cent of individuals that suffer from the disease could die. 

TREATMENT
No vaccine for EVD is available. Several vaccines are being tested, but none are available for clinical use. TRANSMISSION

Ebola is introduced into the human population through close contact with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected animals.
Ebola then spreads in the community through human-to-human transmission, with infection resulting from direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes) with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected people, and indirect contact with environments contaminated with such fluids.
Burial ceremonies in which mourners have direct contact with the body of the deceased person can also play a role in the transmission of Ebola.
Men who have recovered from the disease can still transmit the virus through their semen for up to 7 weeks after recovery from illness.
Health-care workers have frequently been infected while treating patients with suspected or confirmed EVD.

PREVENTION:
Wash your hands frequently. As with other infectious diseases, one of the most important preventive measures for Ebola virus is frequent hand-washing. Use soap and water, or use alcohol-based hand rubs containing at least 60 percent alcohol when soap and water aren't available.

Avoid bush meat. In developing countries, wild animals, including nonhuman primates, are sold in local markets. Avoid buying or eating any of these animals.

Avoid contact with infected people. In particular, caregivers should avoid contact with the person's body fluids and tissues, including blood, semen, vaginal secretions and saliva. People with Ebola are most contagious in the later stages of the disease.

Follow infection-control procedures. If you're a health care worker, wear protective clothing — such as gloves, masks, gowns and eye shields. Keep infected people isolated from others. Carefully disinfect and dispose of needles and other instruments. Injection needles and syringes should not be reused.

Don't handle remains. The bodies of people who have died of Ebola disease are still contagious. Specially organized and trained teams should bury the remains, using appropriate safety equipment.

Avoid traveling to areas of known outbreaks.
Watch out for people with flu-like symptoms and sudden fever.Those who notice “strange feeling or symptoms similar to those of Ebola virus, which ranges from fever, headache, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, sore throat and joint pains, which are all symptoms of other ailments, are urged to visit competent health facilities.

In the absence of such facilities, please call the following numbers: 08023169485, 08033086660, 08033065303, 08055281442, 08055329229.

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